Nature

The Life of Bodily and Spiritual Virtue

Pleasures, pains and desires are by nature especially human; and from these, of necessity, every mortal creature is, so to say, suspended and dependent by the strongest cords of influence. Thus one should commend the noblest life, not merely because it is of superior fashion in respect of fair repute, but also because, if a man consents to taste it and not shun it in his youth, it is superior likewise in that which all men covet,—an excess, namely, of joy and a deficiency of pain throughout the whole of life. That this will clearly be the result, if a man tastes of it rightly, will at once be fully evident. But wherein does this “rightness” consist? That is the question which we must now, under the instruction of our Argument, consider; comparing the more pleasant life with the more painful, we must in this wise consider whether this mode is natural to us, and that other mode unnatural. We desire that pleasure should be ours, but pain we neither choose nor desire; and the neutral state we do not desire in place of pleasure, but we do desire it in exchange for pain; and we desire less pain with more pleasure, but we do not desire less pleasure with more pain; and when the two are evenly balanced, we are unable to state any clear preference. Now all these states—in their number, quantity, intensity, equality, and in the opposites thereof—have, or have not, influence on desire, to govern its choice of each. So these things being thus ordered of necessity, we desire that mode of life in which the feelings are many, great, and intense, with those of pleasure predominating, but we do not desire the life in which the feelings of pain predominate; and contrariwise, we do not desire the life in which the feelings are few, small, and gentle, if the painful predominate, but if the pleasurable predominate, we do desire it. Further, we must regard the life in which there is an equal balance of pleasure and pain as we previously regarded the neutral state: we desire the balanced life in so far as it exceeds the painful life in point of what we like, but we do not desire it in so far as it exceeds the pleasant lives in point of the things we dislike. The lives of us men must all be regarded as naturally bound up in these feelings, and what kinds of lives we naturally desire is what we must distinguish; but if we assert that we desire anything else, we only say so through ignorance and inexperience of the lives as they really are. What, then, and how many are the lives in which a man—when he has chosen the desirable and voluntary in preference to the undesirable and the involuntary, and has made it into a private law for himself, by choosing what is at once both congenial and pleasant and most good and noble—may live as happily as man can? Let us pronounce that one of them is the temperate life, one the wise, one the brave, and let us class the healthy life as one; and to these let us oppose four others—the foolish, the cowardly, the licentious, and the diseased. He that knows the temperate life will set it down as gentle in all respects affording mild pleasures and mild pains, moderate appetites and desires void of frenzy; but the licentious life he will set down as violent in all directions, affording both pains and pleasures that are extreme, appetites that are intense and maddening, and desires the most frenzied possible; and whereas in the temperate life the pleasures outweigh the pains, in the licentious life the pains exceed the pleasures in extent, number, and frequency. Whence it necessarily results that the one life must be naturally more pleasant, the other more painful to us; and it is no longer possible for the man who desires a pleasant life voluntarily to live a licentious life, but it is clear by now (if our argument is right) that no man can possibly be licentious voluntarily: it is owing to ignorance or incontinence, or both, that the great bulk of mankind live lives lacking in temperance. Similarly with regard to the diseased life and the healthy life, one must observe that while both have pleasures and pains, the pleasures exceed the pains in health, but the pains the pleasures in disease. Our desire in the choice of lives is not that pain should be in excess, but the life we have judged the more pleasant is that in which pain is exceeded by pleasure. We will assert, then, that since the temperate life has its feelings smaller, fewer and lighter than the licentious life, and the wise life than the foolish, and the brave than the cowardly, and since the one life is superior to the other in pleasure, but inferior in pain, the brave life is victorious over the cowardly and the wise over the foolish; consequently the one set of lives ranks as more pleasant than the other: the temperate, brave, wise, and healthy lives are more pleasant than the cowardly, foolish, licentious and diseased. To sum up, the life of bodily and spiritual virtue, as compared with that of vice, is not only more pleasant, but also exceeds greatly in nobility, rectitude, virtue and good fame, so that it causes the man who lives it to live ever so much more happily than he who lives the opposite life.

— Plato, Laws, Book V (732-734)

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3 thoughts on “The Life of Bodily and Spiritual Virtue

  1. metaOne says:

    In spite of Plato attourning Aristotle, this is precisely how to use the law of contract (private law) to secure One’s office of Authorship – esp on American soil…

  2. Kevin Moore says:

    This came to my mind on reading

    John 15:13 (NKJV)

    13 Greater love has no one than this, than to lay down one’s life for his friends.

  3. Kevin Moore says:

    “………Hope Runs Eternal
    .
    The spiritual realm of this issue cannot be ignored. Our own salvation is at stake. The line between secular realities and the spiritual world becomes blurred. We cannot ignore the human condition of the co-existence of good and evil.
    .
    The solution to our current economic conundrum cannot be found in the constructs of the past systems nor in the construction of new elaborate and centralized systems being devised by the Global Unionists and New World Government fraternity. The solutions lie in the exercise of individual rights and freedoms, of free will and a return to diverse and resilient local markets and the return to healthy and viable communities. The real solution to our human condition must come with the absolute destruction of the current centralized Babel-system being developed, rendering power, money and wealth useless and replaced by a new era of reconciliation, sharing, and love. Against all odds we must remain a people of hope.
    .
    We can already see the destruction of the current system unfolding. The challenge is whether we will awaken from our slumber and have the wisdom to read the signs and the courage to act through freewill against the temptation to default to the New World Order image of a centralist and dictatorial world. We can create our own future e gifted with intellect, discernment, and wisdom to choose wisely the things of earth and to love the things of heaven. The choice we face is an individual one.
    .
    In the end we are naked and return to dust no matter how many pieces of silver are found in our pockets at the end of our day. Our lives will be measured in terms of how we used the gifts we were given in service to others and in stewardship of the “garden” in which we live and have our being.
    .
    http://www.gold-eagle.com/article/unveiling-wizards-oz

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